Bob Dylan – Gipsy Davy 1961 (Gypsy Davey)

Bob Dylan - Gipsy Davy 1961 (Gypsy Davey)
Bob Dylan - Gipsy Davy 1961 (Gypsy Davey)

Gypsy Davy, an Anglo-American ballad, was once well known in Britain and became widespread in America. It is the 200th ballad that the American professor Francis James Child entered in his famous collection of British ballads (compiled in the last half of the 19th century) that is still used as a reference and guide by folkballad scholars.

 

The core of the song’s story is that a lady forsakes a life of luxury to run off with a band of gypsies. In some versions there is one individual, named, for example as Johnny Faa or Black Jack Davy. In some versions there is one leader and his six brothers. In one local tradition, the lady is identified as the wife of the Earl of Cassilis. In some versions the gypsies charm her with their singing, or even cast a spell over her. In a typical version, the lord comes home to find his lady “gone with the gypsy laddie”. He saddles his fastest horse to follow her. He finds her and bids her come home, asking “Would you forsake your husband and child?” She refuses to return: in many versions preferring the cold ground (“What care I for your fine feather sheets?”) and the gypsy’s company to her lord’s wealth and fine bed. At the end of some versions the husband kills the gypsies. In the local Cassilis tradition, they are hung from the Cassilis Dule Tree.

Read Story Here

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Raggle_Taggle_Gypsy

LYRICS

It was late last night when the boss come home
He’s askin’ about his lady
The only answer he received, “She’s gone with the
Gypsy Davy, gone with the gypsy Davy”

“Go saddle for me my buskin’ horse
And a hundred dollars saddle
Point out to me their wagon tracks
And after them I’ll travel, after them I’ll ride”

Well, I had not rode ’til the midnight moon
When I saw the campfire gleaming
I heard the notes of the big guitar
And the voice of the gypsy singin’

That song of the gypsy Dave
There in the light of the camping fire
I saw her fair face beaming
Her heart in tune with the big guitar

And the voice of the gypsy singing
That song of the gypsy Dave
Have you forsaken your house and home
Have you forsaken your baby

Have you forsaken your husband dear
To go to the gypsy Davy
And sing with the gypsy Dave
That song of the gypsy Dave

Yes, I’ve forsaken my husband dear
To go with the gypsy Davy
And I’ve forsaken my mansion high
But not my blue-eyed baby
Not my blue-eyed babe

She smiled to leave her husband dear
And go with the Gypsy Davy
But the tears come a-trickling down her cheeks
To think of the blue-eyed baby
Pretty little blue-eyed babe

Take off, take off your buckskin gloves
Made of Spanish leather
Give to me your lily-white hair
And we’ll ride home together
We’ll ride home again

No, I won’t take off my buckskin gloves
They’re made of Spanish leather
I’ll go my way from day to day
And sing with the Gypsy Davy
That song of the Gypsy Davy
That song of the Gypsy Davy
That song of the Gypsy Dave

 

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